A perfect day in the mountains…for me.

I like sitting on my porch on a day like today when the the sky is that perfect North Carolina blue, the sun is warm on my face, but a spring time breeze is still cool enough to require an extra layer.  My preferred spot isn’t in on of the “directors” chairs we head to at the end of the day where we sit and enjoy the amazing view of the mountains and watch the sun set paint the sky in shades of blues and pinks. On days like today I much prefer my spot on the steps off our deck that leads to our back yard.  The wood has absorbed the heat of the sun and it shares it with me as I lean against the railing for support. I put my head back, close my eyes, and let my other senses take over.  We are blessed to live in a place where, on most days, the only sounds we hear are the rustling trees and the birds. On occasion there may be the sound of tires on a gravel road somewhere near by or of a plane passing overhead, but otherwise, this is the quietest most peaceful spot I have ever lived in my 60-some years. 

Here on my perch, I stretch out my legs as much as I can and use my bent knees to support a book or a favorite magazine. On this particular day, my choice is the latest edition of Garden & Gun, a magazine I never would have chosen on my own, based on the name alone. But I received it as a gift subscription last year and can now no longer do without it. The magazine is based in Charleston, South Carolina and its pages are filled with articles, recipes, stories, and all things southern.  I look forward to its arrival like an old family friend.

The sun glares off the white pages and since reading glasses are a necessity, sunglasses are not an option. I don’t mind really. For reasons unknown to me, I enjoy getting familiar with the contents of a magazine before I delve into reading it page by page.  It’s a lot like reading a restaurant menu.  I look at each offering deciding if it sounds like something I might like, how it is prepared, how many calories might be hiding in the dish, and what it costs. I do all this before considering the next item on the menu. Eventually I narrow down my options and make a choice. 

So it is with me and magazines. I love a good book and welcome those times when I can lose myself in a good story. But books pretty much force the reader to start on page one and follow each page in succession lest they lose the story line. Not magazines.  I can start on the back cover and work my way to the front without missing a thing. On this first pass I notice ads but I might be compelled to read an article if it is a short one or holds some immediate interest for me. More than likely I scan it quickly, making a mental note about the subject matter and file until I have the time an opportunity to read it. It isn’t until I have flipped backwards through all the pages that I decide what I want to read first, and not necessarily in any particular order.

One of the many things that I appreciate about Garden & Gun is the writing. The articles are more like short stories that waste no time grabbing my attention and holding it until the last word. Most issues have some story involving a dog so naturally I go there first. Today, though, my attention lingered in the recipe section where a fresh blackberry and peach cobbler recipe caught my eye. Peaches, juicy ripe berries, and luscious tomatoes are the only reason I tolerate summer and this particular recipe recalled me to my mother’s kitchen and summers growing up in the south. Peach cobbler was a staple in our house when peaches were in season. I can still remember the soft bite of a fresh peach swimming in sweet cinnamon laced juice, perfectly thickened and topped with flaky pie dough. A spot of butter or a scoop of vanilla ice cream made it all the better. My mom is passed now but seeing that recipe and remembering the days when the smell of peach cobbler filled her kitchen fills my heart with sweet memories.

I don’t know when I will have another chance to sit on my steps again like this and do nothing but enjoy the sun and while away my time reading.  Our life is pretty busy these days trying to balance work, projects around the house, and carving out some time for friends. But when I find the opportunity I will spend it on that familiar step looking backwards at a favorite magazine, and maybe a memory or two.

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Vanished. Lost without a trace.

Tuesday May 10, 2016 – 4:45 pm.  

It started like any other afternoon with a game of ball in the side yard.  Our two little dogs, Sunny and Boo chased the tennis balls, Ace ran big circles around us barking at something or nothing at all. We had played this game hundreds of times with Ace eventually loping into the woods to chase a squirrel. Some times he would go deep into the woods to the creek and you could hear his bark echo back. Other times, he would pop out up along the gravel road.  Whatever route he took, rarely was he gone more than an hour and usually it was only a few minutes before he came back to catch his share of the tennis balls. This time, and for reasons no one will ever know, he disappeared into the woods and vanished without a trace.

When an hour had passed and the sun was getting low, we started to look for him. We drove up and down our gravel road knowing the sound of the car usually brings him running for a ride. When that didn’t work we hiked to the creek until it was too dark to see.

Around midnight we drove to a neighboring community on the chance that he had gotten off track and ended up there. Nothing. Concern, fear, and a host of other emotions took over.

IMG_0196 SM We rescued Ace from the old Transylvania County animal shelter 7 years ago because he was on the list to be put down. They were out of room and big black dogs are not a popular choice when it comes to adoption so his prospects were slim. He became part of our family and anyone who knows us, and many who don’t, recognize Ace from his appearances in our real estate videos and around the racquet club where my husband and I play tennis. He was even featured in a video about the relationship people have with their pets that aired on the Dr. Oz show.

We went to bed that night with heavy hearts. His absence left a giant hole in our home and our other two dogs were already showing signs of missing him as much as we were. He is a healthy 95 pounds but because of where we live our heads were spinning with scenarios to explain why he hadn’t come home and none of them were good.

The following morning we did what we knew to do. We contacted the shelter and filed a lost dog report, contacted the local vets in case someone found him, printed “lost dog” flyers and posted them everywhere we could, we placed a “lost dog” ad in the newspaper and with the local radio station. We also contacted the homeowners association for the neighboring community and they agreed to send an email blast to the homeowners with a copy of our flyer. That decision proved to be critical.

We had a basic idea of where Ace might go, but knowing that large dogs can travel as many as 5 miles in a day, and with nearly 300 wooded acres in our immediate area it was like the proverbial needle in a haystack. Where do we start? 

For two days we hiked the woods around us.  There was no clear cut path and the thick Rhododendrons slowed our progress as the briars tugged at our jeans. A friend joined us on the second day but mostly we hiked separately to cover more ground, hoping for some sign of Ace, paying special attention to ravines, holes, or caves that he might have either fallen into or escaped to. We saw plenty of bear scat and other signs of recent bear activity including one cave where the sound of cubs could be heard coming from inside.

 Friday, May 13 – 6:30 am

Robert was standing on the driveway when he heard Ace’s bark coming from deep in the woods below us.  We hadn’t seen or heard from Ace since Tuesday, but like parents, dog owners know the sound of their own dog and we had no doubt that it was Ace. But where was he? 

Robert started off on his way down an old logging road and into the dense woods, following the sound of Ace’s barking and I drove to the road below us as we talked by cell phone. We believed Ace was somewhere between us. I didn’t hear anything from where I was parked then Robert confessed that he wasn’t sure of his own location. I blew the car horn. He couldn’t hear it. Now Robert AND Ace were both lost in the woods.  I needed help. 

I started making calls and soon three friends arrived and two more were on the way. We met up at our house to form a plan, but about that time, Robert found his way through the woods and out to a road he recognized so the search team shifted gears to go look for Ace.  They took the logging road again with a plan to spread out and canvas the area where we believed we had last heard Ace and I went to pick up Robert. It was now coming up on 9:30 am.

Our friends worked their way through the woods and down to the community below. We knew a good portion of their hike was rugged and tough going and we were very grateful for their efforts. Ace was no closer to being found though.

Around noon, we began a new search with two other friends. For the third time, we headed down the logging road, this time, with the plan to hike in a more westerly direction toward where we believed Ace might be. But echoes in the mountains can play cruel tricks on your senses and we got off course. Armed with only our cell phones, efforts to determine our location proved difficult. Google Maps wasn’t enough and a GIS map helped only to a degree. We relied on our iPhone compass and made our way deeper into the woods, facing a steep, densely wooded climb up, stopping two more times to get our bearings. It had been hours since we had last heard anything from Ace and I wondered if now we were lost.  Then, as if on cue, we heard his distinctive howl from below.  We were exhausted and had no more energy to go back down, especially knowing that although we heard him, it was impossible to determine the exact location. There was a collective sigh of relief knowing that Ace was alive, but we had no choice but to find our way out of the woods and come up with a new plan.

Late afternoon, we ventured out for our third search of the day. This time, we would follow the creek that runs below our property. Before setting out, we learned that a friend of ours had consulted a psychic in another state who she has known for years. With no other information, except that we had lost our dog, we were told that Ace wasn’t hurt, that he was in the woods near water, but was disoriented and couldn’t find his way home. It wasn’t much to go on and maybe it was grasping at straws, but we clung to the idea that he was close by as we made our way into the woods once again.

The hike was difficult, through dense vegetation and spring time laurels, with pollen so thick in the air we could see it floating in the sunlight and feel it in our throats.  We pressed on for about three hours with no sign of Ace until we stumbled out of the woods into the backyard of a home, exhausted and profoundly discouraged. 

As luck would have it, the homeowners, Mr. and Mrs. Williams, had received the email about Ace being lost and they told us that they had heard him up in the woods earlier in the day. Physically, we were spent, but our hope was buoyed with this news.

A friend who had stayed at our house to be with our other dogs was called so we could get a ride home and regroup once more. We were back at our house but a few minutes when Mr. Williams called, telling us that he believed Ace was behind their house again. We rushed back and waited. Sure enough, we heard Ace up in the woods. The sound of his mournful howl broke our hearts but now we had a better fix on his location. By car, we were about 2-3 miles from home, but only half of that as the crow flies.

There were times during the day’s search when it seemed Ace was so close but no amount of calling and coaxing could get him to come to us, something we didn’t understand. The bond we have with Ace is strong and there was no reason, or so we thought, for him not to come to us.

At dusk, Robert and I held what could best be described as a vigil alongside the creek on the Williams’ property. We hung some of our clothing on nearby trees to try and give Ace our scent. Mr. Williams gave us hot dogs to set out. Nothing was working. We could hear Ace and were confident he could hear us calling to him but as darkness fell, we knew there was nothing more we could do and returned home. That night, standing on our deck, we could hear our boy Ace crying in the distance. There are no words to describe the helplessness and the heartache we felt knowing he was out there hungry, cold, and scared, and we couldn’t get to him.

 Saturday, May 14 – 6:15 am

Just before dawn, we returned to the creek and the hot dogs left out the night before were untouched. We brought Ace’s metal bowl with some kibble, rattled it and called him to breakfast. That was a sound we knew he’d recognize. It didn’t take long before a conversation with Ace began. We would call to him and he would answer in a sorrow-filled howl. He wasn’t coming to us, but judging from the sound he appeared to be staying in one place, somewhere above us. Robert had hiked the mountain top above us earlier in the week so the decision was made for me to stay where I was and Robert would try to go in from that point. I kept talking to Ace and Robert tracked our voices.

I could faintly hear Robert in the woods above me, but then I got a text saying “I see him and he sees me”.  My heart stopped. I quit calling out to Ace and waited. It was just past dawn and I was alone in the woods with a bowl of dog food in my hand. My knowledge about the area’s bear population was not lost on me as I considered the situation I found myself in,  but it didn’t matter. Ace was now in our sights. 

It seemed like an eternity before I got another text, this time with a blurry image of Ace and Robert together but then came the phone call.

IMG_1862 (1)Robert confirmed that they were indeed together, but they were stuck on a ledge only about 30” wide. There was rock to their right and a 40′ drop off to their left. One wrong move and both of their lives were in danger. There was no way they could get off the ledge safely.

I called 911 as I wrestled with limbs and branches while trying to keep my footing, and scrambled back down the hill, across the creek, and to the Williams’ driveway. Robert had taken our car so when I found my way out there was a moment of panic….how was I going to get to them! Luckily, Mr. Williams was home and was able to take me to the gravel road I knew Robert had taken to get into the woods.

Mr. Williams waited with me until the first responder from my 911 call arrived. The three of us walked the gravel road until we were able to locate Robert by the sound of his voice and then found our way through the woods to him so we could assess the situation. It wasn’t long before a team from Connestee Falls Fire Department and EMS arrived. The team of about six, strapped with gear you’d see on a mountain climber, devised a plan to create a harness for Ace and get him out first, then do the same for Robert.  After insuring that both were attached to safety lines, they hoisted Ace up and brought him up to me, following right behind him was Robert. 

The tears, the relief, and the gratitude we felt for the rescue effort was overwhelming. Even now, when we think back to days leading up to the rescue, when we were living on not much more than hope and peanut butter…fearing the worst but hoping for the best…and then facing a truly life threatening situation, the emotions come flooding back.

IMG_0323We will be forever grateful for the tremendous support we received through social media networks, our tested and true friends and neighbors, and the Connestee Falls Fire and Rescue team.

 Epilogue

Aside from being thin, dirty, and somewhat dehydrated, Ace was in remarkably good shape. Sunny, our middle dog who had barely touched her food and stayed mostly in her bed the entire time Ace was gone is back to normal. Boo, the littlest, is happy to have her big brother back to keep her warm.  The giant void we all had felt the days that he was gone was now filled with peace.

The Sunday following the rescue we were in church when our pastor shared this passage with the congregation. It pertained to an entirely unrelated story he was telling but for us, it spoke right to our hearts.

Psalm 94:17-19

Unless the Lord had given me help,
I would soon have dwelt in the silence of death.
When I said, “My foot is slipping,”
your unfailing love, Lord, supported me.
When anxiety was great within me,
your consolation brought me joy. 

Resuce

What you need to know about radon.

Once a home is under contract, the inspection process begins.  A typical set of inspections include the home inspection, septic, water, termite,  and radon.  Over the years I have found that most people get a blank look on their face when we start talking about radon.  They’ve never heard of it, they don’t know what it is or where it comes from,  and they don’t understand the health risks. So let’s go over the basics.

Radon Element SymbolRadon is an invisible, odorless, tasteless gas that comes from igneous rock and it is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer.  Radon levels can vary greatly depending on where you live, but in North Carolina we recognize the Surgeon General’s recommendation that a test reading should not exceed 4 pCi/l.  In most cases, if the reading is over 4 pCi/l buyers will go back to the seller to request a mitigation system.  Depending on the size of the home, access to a crawlspace, and other factors, a mitigation system runs about $2,000.  While a reading of 4 pCi/l or less is the accepted level, it’s not uncommon to see readings much higher than that but those readings can be affected by several factors, including the weather.  If a radon test result comes back unusually high, we recommend a second test. The tests are inexpensive and worth your peace of mind.

When a radon test kit is placed in your home, it’s extremely important that windows and doors remain closed during the testing period, which is usually 48-72 hours. If you are living in the home, it’s perfectly fine to come and go as you normally would but leaving windows and doors open will compromise the test results.

Radon mitigation is something any buyer should consider whether you are buying an existing home or building a new one.  In our area most new home builders automatically include one in the building process, but not always, so be sure to ask.

Even if you aren’t in the market to buy or sell a home, it’s a good idea to understand radon and the risks associated with it. There are a number of good resources for in-depth information about radon, but this article from the Transylvania Times here in Brevard, North Carolina sums it up nicely.

(source: Transylvania Times, Brevard, NC)

January is National Radon Action Month and the U.S. Environmental Agency (EPA) encourages Americans around the country to test their homes for radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer.

Each year about 21,000 Americans die from lung cancer caused by exposure to radon. Testing is the only way to know if your home has an elevated level of radon. The U.S. Surgeon General and EPA recommend taking action to fix your home if the radon level is 4 picocuries per Liter of air or more. “Testing your home for radon is one of the easiest ways to help keep your family safe and healthy,” said Janet McCabe, acting assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Radiation. “Radon exposure is preventable. Test kits are inexpensive and readily available. Reducing exposure protects families, saves lives and avoids the health care costs of radon-caused lung cancer. Everyone who takes action helps to make America’s homes and schools safer for future generations.”

Affordable do-it-yourself radon test kits are available online, at many home improvement and hardware stores and are easy to use. You can also hire a qualified radon professional. If your home is found to have a high radon level, a professionally installed radon reduction system, using a vent pipe and exhaust fan, will remove the radon from beneath your home and discharge it outside. These systems are affordable, especially compared to the risk of lung cancer.

Taking action to reduce your exposure to radon is a long-term investment in your health and your home.

A working mitigation system is a positive selling point for homes on the market ; in many areas a radon test is a standard part of real estate transactions. If you’re building a new home, work with your builder to include radon-resistant construction techniques.

Radon reduction strategies are included in the National Radon Action Plan, which was launched in November 2015 by EPA, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Department of Health and Human Services and nine national non-governmental organizations. This partnership will help coordinate radon reduction efforts and resources with the goal of preventing 3,200 lung cancer deaths annually by 2020, through increased collaboration and consumer awareness strategies.

For more information on testing and obtaining a radon test kit, contact the state radon office at 1-800-SOS-RADON.

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If you are buying or selling a home in western North Carolina, call the Clay Team today at 828-551-6290 or visit us online at BrevardNCProperty.com.

It’s All About The View

When we first started talking about moving to North Carolina, I would have been happy with a little house tucked deep into the woods. But once we got here and I became more embedded into the area, I gained a better understanding of why homes with a view are so prized.

There is a lot to be said for a cabin in the woods and I’m not knocking it at all but there is just something about looking out the windows and seeing the mountains, the valleys, or the string of mountain tops strung together in a long range view. Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you can find the trifecta and enjoy all three. Even with close in views, it’s mesmerizing watching the clouds rise up, seeing weather systems as they roll in, and it’s especially great to be able to watch the seasons unfold before your eyes.

That’s why I wanted to share two homes with you today. Both of these homes have spectacular views.

The first home is at 100 Sunflower Lane in Pisgah Forest Estates. It’s all one level living, has two workshops, and is perched on a point that gives you a wide view all the way to parts of South Asheville. And…it happens to include the jacuzzi!

Hot tub-1.001

Deck-3.001

 

 

 

 

The second property is 1037 Glen Cannon Drive, also in Pisgah Forest. This is an estate size home with over 4,200 square feet of living space.  It has been recently updated with hard wood floors, a new master suite, and it has countless features that make it an energy efficient home to live in year round.

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Year Round Long Range Views

 

 

 

 

 

 

These homes are located just minutes from the beautiful mountain town of Brevard, North Carolina.   If you’d like more information call me at 828-551-6290 or drop me an email at carol@clayteamrealestate.com

 

Five Things You Can Do To Help Sell Your Home This Year.

Winter is just about over and most people I know are looking forward to the color and warmer temperatures of spring.  It’s also about the time of year that people start thinking about putting their homes on the market.  Typically, our peak season runs from Memorial Day through Thanksgiving.  So, for anyone thinking about selling a home this year, now is the time to get serious about it. There are things that you can be doing now to maximize your chances of selling so when the season starts, you’ll be at the head of the class.screwdriver

So where do you start?  

What needs repair? Fix anything that drips, squeaks, or doesn’t work the way it should.  It could be something simple like tightening up a loose door knob, repairing some screening, or figuring out why that one door always sticks.   Other things like electrical and plumbing may require a professional.  If you don’t think you can be objective enough, ask a friend to go around your home with you to help you see things as a potential buyer would.  Take a walk around the outside of your home as well to see what may have been damaged during the winter months. Look for things like damaged siding, cracks in the driveway, loose or missing shingles on the roof, and peeling paint.

Are all systems a go?  Make certain that your HVAC system has been serviced and in good working order. Check your water heater to make sure there are no leaks.  Replace all filters.

Freshen up a bit.  In most areas it may be too cold to paint outside, but if the inside of your home needs freshening up, this is a good time of year to do it. If you decide you want to repaint, Rustic_Flower_Pots_zpsc9258b10keep it neutral. You may be mad for magenta, but your potential buyer probably isn’t.  Clean your carpets and give your hardwood floors some love. Don’t forget the outside of your home. When temperatures are right, take a hard look at your decks and see if they could use a fresh stain or a coat of paint.  Give your front door some extra attention too.  A great many of us enter our homes through our garage and rarely do we enter through the front door so it’s an area that be easily overlooked. If it’s been a while, give it a fresh coat of paint or stain. Consider adding a seasonal wreath or fun door knocker for some interest. Replace that worn out door mat while you’re at it. Then when all those gorgeous spring flowers start showing up in your favorite garden center, create a pot or two to put by your freshly painted front door.

One thing I can’t say enough about is how important it is to have clean windows. I know. Cleaning windows isn’t my favorite thing to do either. But trust me when I tell you that cleaning your windows will make an enormous difference.  While you’re at it, be sure to get rid of cob webs, dead bugs, leaves or anything else that has found a home on your sills, and don’t forget the screens.  If you can’t reach your windows or simply don’t have the time, hire someone to do it for you. It will be money well spent.

Clear out the clutter.  Face it, most of us just have too much stuff.  As winter winds down, take stock of your closets and storage areas.  Consider donating or disposing of anything you no longer need or haven’t used in the last year.  Clutter is something that can stop a buyer in their tracks because they struggle to see the unique character of your home when there is “stuff” everywhere.  Clutter is also a signal that there may not be sufficient storage….something most buyers covet.

Consider a pre-emptive approach.  In North Carolina, once you enter into a contract with a buyer, they are given a period of time to do their “due diligence”. This is when they perform any and all inspections on your home.  If there are lots of things that need repair it’s likely they will come back and ask you to make those repairs or provide them with a credit.  One approach that some sellers take is to have a home inspection done prior to putting their home on the market so that any issues can be identified and taken care of ahead of time.  The cost is typically $350-$500 or more depending on the size of your home. A licensed home inspector will identify issues with plumbing, electrical, HVAC, water leaks, termite damage, faulty construction and a whole lot more.

For more helpful tips on getting your home ready to sell this year, call the Clay Team at Looking Glass Realty in beautiful Brevard, North Carolina.  Visit us online at BrevardNCProperty.com, or give us a call at 828-551-6290 or 828-551-6291.

 

 

February Market Report

SI ExifBy the time March rolls around, I’m ready for spring.  I love winter and this year it was milder than expected even though we managed to have enough snow for a week or two to make it interesting and feel like winter. But now, I’m ready to see some daffodils and budding trees. I’m also ready to gear up for the buying and selling season.

The February real estate report brings us a good uptick in residential sales over the same time last year.  In February 2015 there were 27 homes sold in Transylvania County compared to 19 the year before.  That puts us only 2 homes ahead for the year, but we’re just beginning the traditional season for buying and selling so all indications are that we will have a great year.

While it may sound like a broken record, our “sweet spot” continues to be in the under $300,000 price range.  Last month the lions share of homes sold in the $150,000 to $250,000 range. During that same time last year, the majority of homes sold in the $150,000 and under range.

As a general rule, we are seeing a settling out in prices.  Sellers have adjusted to the fact that they may not be able to sell their homes for as much as they would like and buyers are beginning to realize that most sellers are not desperate and homes are priced fairly.  For buyers, homes are selling somewhere in the range of 95-97% of the listing.  To further reinforce the strength of our market, homes that are priced properly as selling more quickly and multiple offers have once again become part of the landscape.

Land continues to lag behind home sales. There were only 12 properties sold in February compared to 15 in 2014. There are plenty of fantastic opportunities for anyone wanting to buy land. The catch is the cost of building and the holding costs for the land.

If you would like more information about the Transylvania County market, sign up for our monthly e-newsletter. For more information about the neighboring markets of Henderson and Buncombe, just give us a call.

The Perils of Too Much Information

There is no denying the impact that social media has had on our lives.  Websites like Twitter, LinkdIn, and Facebook make it possible to communicate with people 24/7 no matter where we are in the world. All of these sites all have their places in our lives and our businesses and they can be a fun diversion….when we use a bit of common sense.

Facebook in particular has become a hot spot for all sorts of information sharing and I admit to spending more time there than I should some days.  I learn things, I pass along information that I think my friends would like, and I enjoy the occasional debate over hot topics. But sometimes I’m amazed at what people post about their relationships, their jobs, and frankly the intimate details of their lives. Some posts make me outright uncomfortable because it is just TMI – too much information. In one case, I decided to “unfriend” a woman who posted daily details and photos of her young child’s progress at potty training.  There are just some things I don’t need to know.

This same tendency for “over sharing” can be the un-doing of many a job applicant.  Think those pictures of you having way too much fun at a frat party won’t hurt your image or your chances of landing that job you want? Think again. Today’s employers consider a search on Facebook just another stop in vetting job applicants.

Social media has it’s benefits, though, and can be an effective way of carrying a message to a wide and varied group of people.  So how can Facebook and other social media outlets be used to help you sell your home? Here are a few do’s and don’ts to keep in mind.

• If your Realtor has produced a video or a virtual tour for you, DO get the link and post it on your timeline.  Ask your friends to share it with their friends. Just make sure there is appropriate contact information so anyone who is interested knows who to talk to.
• If you don’t have a video, DO ask for a link to your Broker’s website where your home is featured, and share that link.
(Side note: If your Broker doesn’t do videos or virtual tours and doesn’t have a website, you should consider hiring a different Broker)

BlahDON’T use Facebook as a place to vent about your home’s short comings. As a seller, you are required to disclose what you know about your home such as any trouble you have had with the HVAC, or a roof leak. But the place for that is on a Property Disclosure form provided to you by your Broker.  Facebook is NOT the place to talk about how you cleverly patched that hole in your roof so no one can see it’s damaged and it’s NOT the place to talk about how steep your driveway is or how loud your neighbors are. At least not if you’re trying to sell your home any time soon.
• If you’ve already moved to a new location DON’T tell the world of Facebook that the home you are selling is now vacant.  It’s the same reason you don’t announce that you’re leaving the next day for vacation.  That kind of information is dangerous in the wrong hands.
In today’s information world, you don’t have to be the FBI to find out pretty much anything you really want to know about a property including how much some one paid for it, whether or not there is a mortgage, or how many times it’s been on and off the market. It’s all out there somewhere if you know where to look for it. The same is true for  a lot of your personal information.  Now, in addition to public records, today’s savvy buyers are using Facebook and websites like it to gain more information about sellers including the home they are selling.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to using a little common sense. To paraphrase that now famous slogan for Las Vegas…what you post on the internet stays on the internet.