Why We Foster.

img_0769

When we agree to foster a rescue animal, we agree to save a life. We agree to nourish their neglected bodies with healthy food and mend their tattered souls with love. We agree to tend to their wounds both physical and emotional. We agree to assure these innocents that the life they knew before is past; that kinder hands are there to carry them forward to a better place. We agree to look past the fear in their eyes, placed there by those who came before us. We agree to help them see, instead, the compassion in our eyes and to feel the safety that we offer them. And when the time has come, and the door to their forever home has swung open, our work will be done. We agree that there will be tears of sadness as we watch them leave our nest, taking with them a bit of our heart. But there will be tears of joy mingled with the sadness because we can all agree their life, and ours, have both been made better because we agreed to foster.

“Dogs leave paw prints on our heart”

Vanished. Lost without a trace.

Tuesday May 10, 2016 – 4:45 pm.  

It started like any other afternoon with a game of ball in the side yard.  Our two little dogs, Sunny and Boo chased the tennis balls, Ace ran big circles around us barking at something or nothing at all. We had played this game hundreds of times with Ace eventually loping into the woods to chase a squirrel. Some times he would go deep into the woods to the creek and you could hear his bark echo back. Other times, he would pop out up along the gravel road.  Whatever route he took, rarely was he gone more than an hour and usually it was only a few minutes before he came back to catch his share of the tennis balls. This time, and for reasons no one will ever know, he disappeared into the woods and vanished without a trace.

When an hour had passed and the sun was getting low, we started to look for him. We drove up and down our gravel road knowing the sound of the car usually brings him running for a ride. When that didn’t work we hiked to the creek until it was too dark to see.

Around midnight we drove to a neighboring community on the chance that he had gotten off track and ended up there. Nothing. Concern, fear, and a host of other emotions took over.

IMG_0196 SM We rescued Ace from the old Transylvania County animal shelter 7 years ago because he was on the list to be put down. They were out of room and big black dogs are not a popular choice when it comes to adoption so his prospects were slim. He became part of our family and anyone who knows us, and many who don’t, recognize Ace from his appearances in our real estate videos and around the racquet club where my husband and I play tennis. He was even featured in a video about the relationship people have with their pets that aired on the Dr. Oz show.

We went to bed that night with heavy hearts. His absence left a giant hole in our home and our other two dogs were already showing signs of missing him as much as we were. He is a healthy 95 pounds but because of where we live our heads were spinning with scenarios to explain why he hadn’t come home and none of them were good.

The following morning we did what we knew to do. We contacted the shelter and filed a lost dog report, contacted the local vets in case someone found him, printed “lost dog” flyers and posted them everywhere we could, we placed a “lost dog” ad in the newspaper and with the local radio station. We also contacted the homeowners association for the neighboring community and they agreed to send an email blast to the homeowners with a copy of our flyer. That decision proved to be critical.

We had a basic idea of where Ace might go, but knowing that large dogs can travel as many as 5 miles in a day, and with nearly 300 wooded acres in our immediate area it was like the proverbial needle in a haystack. Where do we start? 

For two days we hiked the woods around us.  There was no clear cut path and the thick Rhododendrons slowed our progress as the briars tugged at our jeans. A friend joined us on the second day but mostly we hiked separately to cover more ground, hoping for some sign of Ace, paying special attention to ravines, holes, or caves that he might have either fallen into or escaped to. We saw plenty of bear scat and other signs of recent bear activity including one cave where the sound of cubs could be heard coming from inside.

 Friday, May 13 – 6:30 am

Robert was standing on the driveway when he heard Ace’s bark coming from deep in the woods below us.  We hadn’t seen or heard from Ace since Tuesday, but like parents, dog owners know the sound of their own dog and we had no doubt that it was Ace. But where was he? 

Robert started off on his way down an old logging road and into the dense woods, following the sound of Ace’s barking and I drove to the road below us as we talked by cell phone. We believed Ace was somewhere between us. I didn’t hear anything from where I was parked then Robert confessed that he wasn’t sure of his own location. I blew the car horn. He couldn’t hear it. Now Robert AND Ace were both lost in the woods.  I needed help. 

I started making calls and soon three friends arrived and two more were on the way. We met up at our house to form a plan, but about that time, Robert found his way through the woods and out to a road he recognized so the search team shifted gears to go look for Ace.  They took the logging road again with a plan to spread out and canvas the area where we believed we had last heard Ace and I went to pick up Robert. It was now coming up on 9:30 am.

Our friends worked their way through the woods and down to the community below. We knew a good portion of their hike was rugged and tough going and we were very grateful for their efforts. Ace was no closer to being found though.

Around noon, we began a new search with two other friends. For the third time, we headed down the logging road, this time, with the plan to hike in a more westerly direction toward where we believed Ace might be. But echoes in the mountains can play cruel tricks on your senses and we got off course. Armed with only our cell phones, efforts to determine our location proved difficult. Google Maps wasn’t enough and a GIS map helped only to a degree. We relied on our iPhone compass and made our way deeper into the woods, facing a steep, densely wooded climb up, stopping two more times to get our bearings. It had been hours since we had last heard anything from Ace and I wondered if now we were lost.  Then, as if on cue, we heard his distinctive howl from below.  We were exhausted and had no more energy to go back down, especially knowing that although we heard him, it was impossible to determine the exact location. There was a collective sigh of relief knowing that Ace was alive, but we had no choice but to find our way out of the woods and come up with a new plan.

Late afternoon, we ventured out for our third search of the day. This time, we would follow the creek that runs below our property. Before setting out, we learned that a friend of ours had consulted a psychic in another state who she has known for years. With no other information, except that we had lost our dog, we were told that Ace wasn’t hurt, that he was in the woods near water, but was disoriented and couldn’t find his way home. It wasn’t much to go on and maybe it was grasping at straws, but we clung to the idea that he was close by as we made our way into the woods once again.

The hike was difficult, through dense vegetation and spring time laurels, with pollen so thick in the air we could see it floating in the sunlight and feel it in our throats.  We pressed on for about three hours with no sign of Ace until we stumbled out of the woods into the backyard of a home, exhausted and profoundly discouraged. 

As luck would have it, the homeowners, Mr. and Mrs. Williams, had received the email about Ace being lost and they told us that they had heard him up in the woods earlier in the day. Physically, we were spent, but our hope was buoyed with this news.

A friend who had stayed at our house to be with our other dogs was called so we could get a ride home and regroup once more. We were back at our house but a few minutes when Mr. Williams called, telling us that he believed Ace was behind their house again. We rushed back and waited. Sure enough, we heard Ace up in the woods. The sound of his mournful howl broke our hearts but now we had a better fix on his location. By car, we were about 2-3 miles from home, but only half of that as the crow flies.

There were times during the day’s search when it seemed Ace was so close but no amount of calling and coaxing could get him to come to us, something we didn’t understand. The bond we have with Ace is strong and there was no reason, or so we thought, for him not to come to us.

At dusk, Robert and I held what could best be described as a vigil alongside the creek on the Williams’ property. We hung some of our clothing on nearby trees to try and give Ace our scent. Mr. Williams gave us hot dogs to set out. Nothing was working. We could hear Ace and were confident he could hear us calling to him but as darkness fell, we knew there was nothing more we could do and returned home. That night, standing on our deck, we could hear our boy Ace crying in the distance. There are no words to describe the helplessness and the heartache we felt knowing he was out there hungry, cold, and scared, and we couldn’t get to him.

 Saturday, May 14 – 6:15 am

Just before dawn, we returned to the creek and the hot dogs left out the night before were untouched. We brought Ace’s metal bowl with some kibble, rattled it and called him to breakfast. That was a sound we knew he’d recognize. It didn’t take long before a conversation with Ace began. We would call to him and he would answer in a sorrow-filled howl. He wasn’t coming to us, but judging from the sound he appeared to be staying in one place, somewhere above us. Robert had hiked the mountain top above us earlier in the week so the decision was made for me to stay where I was and Robert would try to go in from that point. I kept talking to Ace and Robert tracked our voices.

I could faintly hear Robert in the woods above me, but then I got a text saying “I see him and he sees me”.  My heart stopped. I quit calling out to Ace and waited. It was just past dawn and I was alone in the woods with a bowl of dog food in my hand. My knowledge about the area’s bear population was not lost on me as I considered the situation I found myself in,  but it didn’t matter. Ace was now in our sights. 

It seemed like an eternity before I got another text, this time with a blurry image of Ace and Robert together but then came the phone call.

IMG_1862 (1)Robert confirmed that they were indeed together, but they were stuck on a ledge only about 30” wide. There was rock to their right and a 40′ drop off to their left. One wrong move and both of their lives were in danger. There was no way they could get off the ledge safely.

I called 911 as I wrestled with limbs and branches while trying to keep my footing, and scrambled back down the hill, across the creek, and to the Williams’ driveway. Robert had taken our car so when I found my way out there was a moment of panic….how was I going to get to them! Luckily, Mr. Williams was home and was able to take me to the gravel road I knew Robert had taken to get into the woods.

Mr. Williams waited with me until the first responder from my 911 call arrived. The three of us walked the gravel road until we were able to locate Robert by the sound of his voice and then found our way through the woods to him so we could assess the situation. It wasn’t long before a team from Connestee Falls Fire Department and EMS arrived. The team of about six, strapped with gear you’d see on a mountain climber, devised a plan to create a harness for Ace and get him out first, then do the same for Robert.  After insuring that both were attached to safety lines, they hoisted Ace up and brought him up to me, following right behind him was Robert. 

The tears, the relief, and the gratitude we felt for the rescue effort was overwhelming. Even now, when we think back to days leading up to the rescue, when we were living on not much more than hope and peanut butter…fearing the worst but hoping for the best…and then facing a truly life threatening situation, the emotions come flooding back.

IMG_0323We will be forever grateful for the tremendous support we received through social media networks, our tested and true friends and neighbors, and the Connestee Falls Fire and Rescue team.

 Epilogue

Aside from being thin, dirty, and somewhat dehydrated, Ace was in remarkably good shape. Sunny, our middle dog who had barely touched her food and stayed mostly in her bed the entire time Ace was gone is back to normal. Boo, the littlest, is happy to have her big brother back to keep her warm.  The giant void we all had felt the days that he was gone was now filled with peace.

The Sunday following the rescue we were in church when our pastor shared this passage with the congregation. It pertained to an entirely unrelated story he was telling but for us, it spoke right to our hearts.

Psalm 94:17-19

Unless the Lord had given me help,
I would soon have dwelt in the silence of death.
When I said, “My foot is slipping,”
your unfailing love, Lord, supported me.
When anxiety was great within me,
your consolation brought me joy. 

Resuce

Tips For Hiking With Your Four Legged Friends.

Hiking is an extremely popular activity in the Brevard area. The Dupont State Forest, Pisgah National Forest, and Gorges State Park are all here in our backyard and they offer up great trails and spectacular scenery.

If you hike on a regular basis, you probably already know the basics….wear good shoes, take plenty of water, dress for the weather, pack a map, and always let someone know where you are going. In this part of western North Carolina there is the added advice to stay off of the waterfalls.  There are over 260 waterfalls in Transylvania County and they are all beautiful, but they are also dangerous and every year people die from venturing too far out. So when it comes to waterfalls, admire them from a distance, please.

What if you like hiking with your dog? What are some things to remember to make it a fun adventure for both of you?

Stay cool. Take plenty of breaks
It’s a lot easier for you to stay cool than it is for your dog. The only way dogs can stay cool is by panting. Give yourself and your pup plenty of opportunities to stop and sit in the shade, especially during the summer months. There are also vests that you can buy that help your best friend stay cool. You soak them in water and it cools your pet while he’s wearing it. While you’re out, watch your dog for signs of over heating like panting more than usual, lethargy, or vomiting.

HanesKeep the bugs off
Ticks can be a big problem for dogs, and they like to hang out in the tall grasses. Minimize the chances of getting ticks by staying on the trail.  Monthly flea and tick medicines will also help keep those little suckers off your dog. Don’t forget to check yourself and your dog for ticks when you get home.

Carry plenty of fresh water
That seems pretty logical doesn’t it. But there is another reason. Some pets may experience upset stomach from drinking water in rivers and ponds because of the naturally occurring bacteria.  If you live in an area like we do and you hike a lot or take your pets to rivers to swim, talk to your vet about a vaccination that combats any contamination found in the water. Let’s face it…wild animals also enjoy the rivers and animals will do what they do in the water and that can cause problems when the water is ingested by your dog. We have our three dogs vaccinated every year.

Consider a Bear Bell
If you hike with your dog off leash, consider outfitting him with a bear bell. It’s a bell with a small velcro band that you attach to your dog’s collar. That way, if they get out of your sight, you can still hear them.  The noise made by the bell is also a good warning to snakes and other wild animals.  Check your favorite pet store or outdoor stores like Cabela.

Bring the Benadryl
Bugs bite dogs as well as their humans and plants that can make you itch can also make your dog itch so pack some Benadryl for both of you. Check with your vet first so you know how much Benadryl you can give your dog and when to give it. Dogs metabolise the drug very differently than we do so it is important to know the right dosage for your dog.

The Brevard area is a terrific place for getting outside and enjoying all the great scenery and natural surroundings. So get out there with your best friend and have some fun!

                                                                                                                                                                                                          ####

Image

Ace, pictured here, is one of our three dogs that we have rescued over the last few years. He’s 97 pounds of pure love and the best real estate dog on the planet.

Above is our friend Hanes Hoffman and his best friend Hops. They spend a lot of time together on area trails. Hanes is also the owner  Bluewater Copper Works.

 

 

Keep Your Pets Safe This Holiday Season

christmas-treeThe holiday season is a joyous time of year that we all look forward to. But when it comes to our pets, it can also be a stressful and potentially dangerous season. With some planning and a little vigilance on our part, though, we can insure that Fido and Fluffy have a safe and happy holiday with the rest of the family.

Holiday Food – The family is gathered around a table filled with a bounty of great food like turkey or ham, stuffing, buttery rich potatoes, gravy, and more. As tempting as it may be to slip your pet a bite or two of the family feast, don’t do it. These rich fatty foods can lead to pancreatitis which can cause long term organ damage or death. Of course, never ever give your pet turkey bones. They can easily splinter causing intestinal blockage.  If you have a large pet that is prone to “counter surfing”, like our 95 pound plott hound Ace, make sure the turkey and all the fixings are kept safely out of reach.

Another potentially deadly foods to avoid:

Chocolate – That bit of cocoa goodness that we all enjoy can be lethal to our pets. Chocolate contains theobromine, a stimulate that is safe for humans, but not animals. A dog weighing less than 20 pounds can die from ingesting as little as .5 to 2 oz of unsweetened chocolate.

Avocado – Can cause vomiting and diarrhea

Grapes – They contain a toxin than can cause kidney damage

Mushrooms – They contain a variety of toxins that are lethal

Onions or Garlic – Both destroy red blood cells and can lead to anemia

Macadamia nuts – It only takes 6 of these to cause a dog’s heart rate to dramatically increase, leading to paralysis, vomiting, and death.

Pretty But Deadly – A Christmas tree is the centerpiece of holiday decorating in most homes, but it can be a holiday hazard for your pets.

  • It’s a good idea to hang breakable ornaments higher on the tree to eliminate any potential temptation. Cats in particular are attracted to shiny tinsel and ornaments that they think are toys.
  • Keep your tree watered, but make sure your pets don’t drink from it. Stagnant water harbors potentially dangerous bacteria and tree fertilizers or other products used to prolong the life of your tree can be poisonous to your pets.
  • Poinsettias and mistletoe add a splash of color to your holiday decorating, but if your pet nibbles on them they can cause nausea, vomiting, and possible death.
  • After all the presents are unwrapped, make sure to pick up an paper and ribbons. Ribbons in particular can be a hazard when they are swallowed.

The Deadliest Danger – According to research, over 10,000 pets die every year from ingesting antifreeze. Dogs and cats are both drawn to it because of the sweet taste. Ingesting even small amounts can cause brain damage, and kidney failure. Cats can easily ingest the toxin by licking their paws after walking through a puddle that has antifreeze in it. A few ounces can kill a 60 pound dog. Often death can occur within 72 hours. A pet that has ingested antifreeze may appear “drunk” and wobbly, become depressed, vomit, have seizures and eventually sink into a coma. If you see any of these symptoms in your pet act quickly!

Cold Weather Hazards – Snow and ice are just a part of living in this area during the winter months, but it can be especially hard on your pets. After a walk or even just time spent in the yard, be sure to wipe your pet’s paws off with a dry towel. This not only insure they stay comfortable, you’re also wiping off irritants like ice or salt.

Make It Stress Free – We all get into our comfortable routines and that includes our pets. During the holiday, if you have house guests, entertain frequently, or are gone more than usual, make sure to give your fur babies a little extra TLC. If your pet is especially shy or fearful of strangers, make a “safe place” for them where they can get away from things when they need to. If Fido is used to a walk at a certain time of day, try to keep that schedule, but if you can’t make sure you work in some form of exercise when you can.

This holiday season, take some time to “holiday proof” your home early. Avoid the rush!

Brevard NC Rescue Dogs Need Your Help!

Here’s this week’s most recent rescue dogs from the Brevard, NC area.  Please pass this along to anyone you know who can help and please re-posts these notices so we get the word out to as many people as possible. If you, or someone you know is affiliated with any breed rescue groups, we’d love to hear from you!

Thanks as always for caring about our 4-legged friends.

Dunbar

Husky. Probably about a year old. Needs housebreaking and neutering. Available now.

Indiana

Stray Brindle Pitt (12-15) male 40 pounds unneutered friendly, does NOT like leash, Pine Crest Apartments. Available Monday December 21.

Hannah

MOST URGENT. Needs immediate rescue.

Harold

Stray male black lab (December 11) Maybe 6 months old, 50 pounds found on Daimond’s Creek. Available Wednesday December 16.

Helena

Helena

Stray female Retriever(?) mix (December 11) found on Ross Road near the shelter

Available Wednesday December 16

India

Stray mix female (12-14),less than a year old, 15-20 pounds, very underweight (Pet of the week) Available Monday, December 20.

Isaac

Stray Plott, young male,found on Diamond’s Creek, about 45 pounds, 2-3 years old, friendly. Plotts are the state dog of North Carolina.   Available Monday December 20